News Archive

Displaying 1 - 10 of 74
12 Feb 2020
In a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Kutzbach and a team of researchers trace changes in climate and vegetation in Africa, Arabia and the Mediterrane
27 Jan 2020
Remains from an ancient gravesite in Cameroon have opened a window into the world of the people who lived in western central Africa before farming and herding became widespread.
22 Jan 2020
"The inhabitants of the Border Cave in the Lebombo Mountains on the Kwazulu-Natal/eSwatini border were cooking starchy plants 170 thousand years ago," says Professor Lyn Wadley, a scientist from the Wits Evolutionar
12 Dec 2019
A painting discovered on the wall of an Indonesian cave has been found to be 44,000 years old.

The art appears to show a buffalo being hunted by part-human, part-animal creatures holding spears and possibly ropes.
10 Dec 2019
The Kent and Ward Fund was established as a result of two generous bequests from long-term members of the South African Archaeological Society.
02 Dec 2019
New research from an international team of scientists led by University of Cape Town (UCT) isotope geochemist Dr Robyn Pickering is the first to provide a timeline for fossils from the caves within the Cradle of Humankind.
23 Nov 2019
Many may know little about the archaeological site near Piketberg, where more than 400 engraved ostrich eggshells, dating from around 65000 to 80000 years ago, were discovered.
13 Nov 2019
More than 11 million years ago, an oddball ape equipped with human-like legs and robust ape-like arms clambered across tree limbs, possibly escaping feline predators. That's the picture that scientists have gleaned about a new species of fossil ape discovered in Bavaria.
06 Nov 2019
After an archiving audit of the UCT Human Skeletal Collection in 2017, the university discovered that it had 11 skeletons in its collection that were unethically obtained by the institution in the 1920s. The university has acknowledged this past injustice, which forms part of its history.
31 Oct 2019
Easter Island’s Polynesian society cultivated crops in soil made especially fertile by the quarrying of rock for massive, humanlike statues, a new study suggests.