News Archive

Displaying 11 - 20 of 48
30 Oct 2017
Humans living in South Africa in the Middle Stone Age used advanced heating techniques to vastly improve their living conditions during the era.
30 Oct 2017
Members who attended the Western Cape Branch One-day lecture series on Climate Change on 28 August 2016 were interested in reading further on some of the issues, particularly the Milankovitch Cycles that summarise the periodic changes in the position of the Earth in relation to the Sun which affect the build-up or melting of polar ice caps.
30 Oct 2017
The theory of Female Cosmetic Coalitions (FCC) is a new and controversial attempt to explain the evolutionary emergence of art, ritual and symbolic culture in Homo sapiens.
30 Oct 2017
Dear members and friends,
 
It is a pleasure to include a letter of introduction, the tour programme and a booking form for the South African Archaeological Society's 14-day adventure to the highlands plateau in north-western Ethiopia.
30 Oct 2017
Findings in South Africa show that innovation among early humans was not primarily driven by climate change. Up until now climate change has frequently been considered a primary driver of innovation in the Stone Age in South Africa.
30 Oct 2017
Prehistoric ancestors creating human hand stencils in caves 40,000 years ago can now be identified as male or female with more than 90% accuracy.
30 Oct 2017
Neanderthals dosed themselves with painkillers and possibly penicillin, according to a study of their teeth. One sick Neanderthal chewed the bark of the poplar tree, which contains a chemical related to aspirin. He may
30 Oct 2017
Dear Members,
    Herewith the second newsletter of 2017 from the Western Cape Branch of the SA Archaeological Society..
    * An outing to Durbanville on Saturday morning 8 April is advertised for booking.
    * A proposed excursion to the Karoo and N.
30 Oct 2017
Mpho Raborife, News24
Johannesburg - A year and a half after fossils belonging to the Homo naledi species were discovered, scientists and researchers can now reveal that it is highly likely that the species lived alongside Homo sapiens (early humans).
30 Oct 2017
Homo naledi’s significant impact.
In an accompanying paper, led by Berger, entitled Homo naledi and Pleistocene hominin evolution in subequatorial Africa, the team discusses the importance of finding such a primitive species at such a time and place.