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Terraced fields near Lydenburg, Mpumalanga
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Patrick Carter and Patricia Vinnicombe sorting finds at Sehonghong in Lesotho in 1972

what we do

The South African Archaeological Society, also known as ArchSoc, is a registered non-profit organisation. Membership is open to anyone with an interest in archaeology. The Society promotes archaeological research in southern Africa and makes the results available to its members and the public through lectures, outings, tours and publications.

ABOUT US

The South African Archaeological Society was founded in Cape Town as the Cape Archaeological Society in August 1944 by Professor John Goodwin. The aim of the South African Archaeological Society, as set out in our constitution, is to bridge the gap between professional archaeologists and people from all walks of life who enjoy the subject.
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SAAB

The South African Archaeological Bulletin (SAAB) was established in 1945. It is an internationally renowned journal (ISI & IBSS listed) that publishes on all aspects of African archaeology. It has amongst the highest citation index rating of all world archaeological journals.

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RESOURCES

Please read more to see a list of free archaeological resources currently available from the South African Archaeological Society

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FAQ

Please read more to see a list of answers to frequently asked questions about the Society


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LATEST NEWS

18 Sep 2019
Scientists have discovered the earliest direct evidence of milk consumption by humans. The team identified milk protein entombed in calcified dental plaque (calculus) on the teeth of prehistoric farmers from Britain.
12 Sep 2019
Italians are some of the fastest speakers on the planet, chattering at up to nine syllables per second. Many Germans, on the other hand, are slow enunciators, delivering five to six syllables in the same amount of time.
04 Sep 2019
In 1860, Robert Burke and William Wills famously led the first European expedition across the largely unknown interior of Australia. The local Yandruwandha people seemed to thrive despite the conditions that were proving so tough for Wills's party.

latest events & activities

By: Sarah Wurz
Date: Tue, 08/10/2019 - 18:30
Western Cape
 
Frequent visits by hunter-gatherer-fisher groups to the southern Cape coastal site, Klasies River main
site,  a favoured refuge especially during the Middle Stone Age, led to the build-up of 21 meters of shell
By: Lecture by Dr Saarah Jappie
Date: Thu, 17/10/2019 - 19:30
Northern
By: Outing with Mr Emilio Coccia
Date: Sun, 20/10/2019 - 10:30
Northern